At this current point in time, the United Kingdom is facing a shortage of citizens who take up a career in STEM related subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths). This is a national crisis. At Biddick Primary School we are tackling this crisis head on, deconstructing the stereotype that all Scientists are males in white lab coats. At the start of the academic year all children, across EYFS, KS1 and KS2 discuss what a Scientist actually looks like. Female, male, young, old, rich, poor, tall and small! The end result encourages children to see themselves and their teachers as Scientists. At Biddick Primary School we celebrate the awe and wonder about life and the scale of living things from the smallest micro organism to the largest tree and the interdependence of all living things and materials of the Earth. It concerns the emotional drive to know more and to wonder about the world. 

 

 

Please use your child's year group to find out what they are learning about each half term or click on your child's year group below for an overview of the subject.

Year 1/2 Science                  Year 3 Science                  Year 4 Science                  Year 5 Science                  Year 6 Science

 

 

 

Progress and outcomes are decided upon using a combination of summative assessments, formative assessment and evidence over time in the child’s book. The school Science Subject Leader (Miss Harris) monitors progress throughout the school with the recently introduced science assessment procedure, sharing areas of best practice. Class teachers ensure that children have sufficient support to at least work towards their year groups objectives.

Baseline Assessment

  • At the start of the academic year, all children across KS1 and KS2 complete a baseline assessment. These have been created by the Science Subject Leader and reflect progression in content and skills, for each year group.
  • This assessment is then repeated at the end of the Summer Term, to identify areas of weakness, progression and understanding. 

 

Prior Knowledge

  • During the first lesson of a topic, prior knowledge is an explicit focus so that children are can identify their initial understanding. The children usually use a mind map or shared shared discussion with their class to share what they already know, at the start of a new topic in Science.

Child Friendly Targets

  • In the back of Science books all children have a year group specific Biddick Primary Assessment grid, which has been created by the Subject Leader.
  • This grid identifies statutory topic based learning objectives ad ‘working scientifically’ objectives.
  • When a child has achieved this objective, the teacher will highlight the statement on the grid.
  • This is an ongoing form of assessment which allows teachers to identify whether a child has met a specific target or is working towards that objective. 
  • These targets have also proved beneficial as an initial planning tool for teachers, who are able to determine a whole year overview and year group group specific working scientifically skills, from one document.  

 

E.Y.F.S.

  • Early Years Foundation Stage follow the 'Development Matters' document when planning and reviewing attainment in science.
  • Science based learning follows the interests presented by the children in EYFS.
  • EYFS 'Knowledge and Understanding of the World' may be evidenced using photographs of the children working scientifically. Any oral evidence is recorded by teachers during their observations.

 

Termly Reports

  • Reports to parents are written once a term, describing each child’s attitude to science, his/her progress in scientific enquiry and understanding of the content of science. 

 

 

January 2019

 

December 2018

November 2018

 

 

 

 

 

October 2018

September 2018

July 2018

June 2018

May 2018

April 2018

Spiritual education in Science involves the search for meaning and purpose in natural and physical phenomena. It is the wonder about what is special about life, an awe at the scale of living things from the smallest micro organism to the largest tree and the interdependence of all living things and materials of the Earth. It concerns the emotional drive to know more and to wonder about the world and aesthetically appreciate its wonders including for example the enormity of space and the beauty of natural objects or phenomenon. At Biddick Primary School children demonstrate spiritual awareness by; reflecting on experiments; respectfully exploring the idea of evolution; asking questions and planning fair tests; exploring and understanding the world and discussing the importance of Scientists and their pioneering discoveries.Moral education in Science encourages pupils to become increasingly curious, to develop open mindedness to the suggestions of others and to make judgements on evidence not prejudice. Students realise that moral dilemmas are often involved in scientific developments. When considering the environment the use of further natural resources and its effect on future generations is an important moral consideration. At Biddick Primary School, our Scientists demonstrate moral awareness by; evaluating experiments and using their evidence to support further findings; planning fair tests; expressing their views honestly, yet respectfully; discussing pioneering female Scientists and their posthumous awards and evaluating the impact of experiments in the wider world.

At this current point in time, the United Kingdom is facing a shortage of citizens who take up a career in STEM related subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths). This is a national crisis. At Biddick Primary School we are tackling this crisis head on, deconstructing the stereotype that all Scientists are males in white lab coats. At the start of the academic year all children, across EYFS, KS1 and KS2 discuss what a Scientist actually looks like. Female, male, young, old, rich, poor, tall and small! The end result encourages children to see themselves and their teachers as Scientists. At Biddick Primary School, our Scientists (aged from 3 to 57 years) demonstrate social awareness through; group practical work which provides opportunities for pupils to develop team working skills and to take responsibility; taking responsibility for their own and other people’s safety when undertaking practical work and considering the benefits and drawbacks of scientific and technological developments.

Cultural education in Science involves thinking of scientific discoveries as much of a part of our culture as great music and films. Throughout the curriculum, in all year groups, children are introduced to pioneering Scientists and their discoveries. In addition to local, regional and national discoveries, credit is given to scientific discoveries of other cultures. Science is also seen as a contemporary activity and developments are made all over the modern world. It is therefore an activity undertaken by a wide range of men and women in many different cultures both now and in the past. The interdependence of the world in environmental issues is central to science. Scientists at Biddick Primary School demonstrate cultural awareness by; opening their mind to new ideas; learning about a range of successful Scientists from a wide variety of cultures; utilising the local environment to observe, draw conclusions and conduct experiments; asking questions to see out answers; having a zero tolerance attitude towards discrimination and identifying what a Scientist by ‘look like’ in a range of cultures. We are Scientists at Biddick Primary School.

If you have any comments, queries or bright ideas for Science at Biddick Primary School, please feel free to get in contact with Miss Harris, our Science Subject Leader. Miss Harris is also our Year 5 teacher and is present on the KS2 yard doors each morning.

Biddick Primary School Science Policy